2nd January 2008

“I am a lover of truth, a worshipper of freedom, a celebrant at the altar of language and purity and tolerance. That is my religion, and every day I am sorely, grossly, heinously and deeply offended, wounded, mortified and injured by a thousand different blasphemies against it. When the fundamental canons of truth, honesty, compassion and decency are hourly assaulted by fatuous bishops, pompous, illiberal and ignorant priests, politicians and prelates, sanctimonious censors, self-appointed moralists and busy-bodies, what recourse of ancient laws have I? None whatever. Nor would I ask for any. For unlike these blistering imbeciles my belief in my religion is strong and I know that lies will always fail and indecency and intolerance will always perish.”

Stephen Fry

8 Responses to “2nd January 2008”

  1. Terence Meaden Says:

    I too am a lover of truth, except that I have no desire to call my rational anti-theism by the name of religion even if only metaphorically.
    The monothesitic religions that burden humanity are but the exaggerated storytelling of desert tribes that began in Bronze Age times.
    The world as we observe it from Earth-based cosmology, astronomy and science has run a course of 13.7 billion years without any religion so far as we can tell, apart from the pathetic inventions to which some humans have aspired in recent millennia.
    We have no recourse to ancient laws because the greatest scientific achievements that support atheism are of the last two centuries. Terence Meaden

  2. Renshia Says:

    ” The monotheistic religions that burden humanity are but the exaggerated storytelling of desert tribes that began in Bronze Age times.”

    I think there was a bunch of guys getting drunk and decided to play a joke and some poor smuck that believed it was real, then it all got out of control. But, it could have been in the bronze age.
    They had good stiff ale back then.

  3. Terence Meaden Says:

    TM: “The monotheistic religions that burden humanity are but the exaggerated storytelling of desert tribes that began in Bronze Age times.”

    Renshia: “I think there was a bunch of guys getting drunk and decided to play a joke and some poor smuck that believed it was real, then it all got out of control. But, it could have been in the bronze age. They had good stiff ale back then.”

    Prophets were illiterate preachers who liked having adoring acolytes. Illiterate Muhammed is interesting because he was epileptic. He suffered from temporal lobe epilepsy which explains his visions and behaviour. The medical case is well summarised by Ali Sina—for which see his Faith Freedom website and
    http://www.jihadchat.com/index.php?showtopic
    among others.
    As Ali Sina says, the miracle is that over a billion people can submit to the seventh-century guidance of an epileptic hallucinator.
    e.g. From the Arabian holy texts of the Muslim Bukhari, Muhammed “fell to the ground like one intoxicated or overcome by sleep… his forehead … bedewed with large drops of perspiration. Inspiration descended unexpectedly, and without any previous warning.” “Then Allah’s Apostle returned with that experience; and the muscles between his neck and shoulders were trembling …” etc. etc. — all examples typical of epilepsy.

    More recent are the English-speaking charlatans Joseph Smith, Charles Taze Russell and L. Ron Hubbard.

  4. Thunder Says:

    * He suffered from temporal lobe epilepsy which explains his visions and behaviour. *

    You forgot the words may and might. Is there a reason why you omit those words when pickover does not?

  5. Thunder Says:

    The reason I ask is that you are the one who claims to (also) love truth but it seems you are overstating the position you tend to believe.

  6. Terence Meaden Says:

    I accept the point. It is preferable to introduce ‘may’ and ‘might’ where appropriate in the above.

    Nonetheless, the explanation as to temporal lobe epilepsy is quite plausible to those having medical expertise.

  7. Thunder Says:

    * I accept the point. It is preferable to introduce ‘may’ and ‘might’ where appropriate in the above. *

    Thanx.

    * Nonetheless, the explanation as to temporal lobe epilepsy *

    The explanation fits better a disqualification of a specific persons witness. I think it is an overstatment to project it as disqualification of all witness. In fact we may have stumbled on another doctrinally disqualifying factor to islam than I have considered before (not speaking of the prospect of epilepsy). Christianity bases its record on the witness of many different persons in first, second and third person while islam is promulgated by only one person.

    * is quite plausible to those having medical expertise. *

    I don`t disagree on the plausibility just any attempt to characterize it as definative.

  8. Chad Wiley Says:

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