5th December 2013

“We made a category mistake – we thought that the relationship was between modernisation and secularisation. In fact it was between modernisation and pluralism.”

Peter Berger

7 Responses to “5th December 2013”

  1. Jeff Says:

    That choice would be find, but nobody seems to include the atheists within the mantle of pluralism. It seems that you need to have some kind of imaginary friend to be recognized…

  2. Jeff Says:

    That choice would be fine, but nobody seems to include the atheists within the mantle of pluralism. It seems that you need to have some kind of imaginary friend to be recognized…

  3. Defiantnonbliever Says:

    All myths welcome but unfortunately reality at best is equated with the myths.

  4. Bruce Williams Says:

    Right on Jeff.

  5. Alan G Nixon Says:

    Berger is a Sociologist. He was one of the biggest supporters of the Secularisation thesis, until empirical reality became more visible. He has changed his opinion on the thesis due to research, and most sociologists now agree that the thesis is flawed due to our extended view of the evidence in recent decades. This evidence has been found outside of Western countries due to more visibility and in Western countries with the emergence of ‘New Age’, spiritualisms, conspiracy theories, fundamentalisms and Global religious identities (including atheism). Atheism (Non-religion/Irreligion) is included in the mantle of pluralism from an academic perspective and the last 5 years has seen an acceleration of study on Non-religious groups, in order to include them more directly. A secular studies program has been set up by Phil Zuckerman at Pitzer College in the US (http://www.pitzer.edu/academics/field_groups/secular_studies/index.asp). In the UK we have the Non-religion and Secularity Research Network (NSRN; http://nsrn.net/). There is also a growing body of literature, search atheism or non-religion in an academic database to see what I mean. We are not treating Non-religion the same as religion, but more research on the irreligious will eventually help in getting the voice of the non-religious recognised more widely.

  6. Jeff Says:

    I’m glad that academics are looking at it from that perspective, but even so it means that they are equating a reality based world-view with the host of mythological ones that humanity has managed to create.

    Frankly, from the standpoint of one who has to put up with the crap that the mythological viewpoints generate on a regular basis, the academic output in this field doesn’t do much for my life.

  7. Alan G Nixon Says:

    “equating a reality based world-view with the host of mythological ones that humanity has managed to create.”

    Sociology does not make value judgments its core business. You want to evaluate the validity of a religious or non-religious truth claim you’ll have to try another discipline like theology. Sociologists are interested in how the beliefs we hold are expressed in social interactions and social structuring. The truth of the claims themselves is not part of our field.