3rd December 2008

“The American lobby group Answers in Genesis, with its $13m annual budget, now has an office in the UK from where staff go round giving illustrated talks about how humans and dinosaurs roamed the earth together. Another conservative group, Truth in Science, has adopted a strategy of lobbying for schools to "Teach the Controversy" in an attempt to get Intelligent Design taught alongside evolution in school science lessons. In 2006 it sent resource packs to the heads of science of all British secondary schools; New Scientist [magazine] claims that 59 schools have used, or plan to use, them.”

Paul Vallely

4 Responses to “3rd December 2008”

  1. Oxymoronic Christhinker Says:

    Indefensible willfilly ignorant stupidity on the part of Christian fundamentalist literalists. Outlaw their activities – no one should be allowed to push “science” that isn’t.

  2. Aelothir Says:

    This could only be justifiable in a balanced education showing the flaws in the logic and evidence forwarded by the intelligent design movement. Kids should be given all the resources they need to learn how to be logical and rational thinkers, locating and identifying compelling scientific ideas, whilst also being able to identify unreasonable, illogical nonsense, such as that found in creationist writings.

  3. Terence Meaden Says:

    Britain has got to act.
    Scientists must work together to defuse and eliminate the teaching travesty that is ‘intelligent’ design. Rich supporters have turned something that was no better than a laughable joke into a sick and dangerous scourge that infects some uneducated minds.

    Are there no rich atheists who can counter with big sums of money the misused wealth of the bible-supporters?

    A series of my articles on the origins of religious fraud and gross biblical lies can be found on

    http://www.atheistnexus.org/group/originsuniverselifehumankindanddarwin

  4. Dan the Man Says:

    It’s distressing that the solution is to seek rich atheists to throw big sums of money into getting schools to teach science, which is supposedly what they should have been doing anyway. If it’s necessary, that’s sad.